Open Road Gallery Online

Every summer we enjoy the parade of bicycle travelers who drop by our office here in Missoula, Montana. These cyclists come from all over the world. Their variety of style, equipment, route, and purpose is endless.

In 1982, Greg Siple began recording our visitors on film and asking them to tell their stories, creating Adventure Cycling's National Bicycle Touring Portrait Collection. The Open Road Gallery features selections from this collection in Adventure Cyclist magazine and here on our website.

The Road Less Traveled
The Road Less Traveled

Roel Mazure, and his saxophone, dropped into our office in September of 1997. The 39-year-old freelance journalist left his home in Amsterdam, The Netherlands, intent on cycling from New York City, to San Francisco, California using the TransAmerica Trail for the greater part of the journey.

Lewis, Clark & Cessna
Lewis, Clark & Cessna

San Francisco physician Tom Hall and his companion, public health practitioner Liz Mcloughlin, turned up in Missoula in July of 1997. They flew into town in a Cessna 172 XP (N736TB) with their Montague folding bikes and camping gear tucked into the fuselage behind their seats. They were on a three-week flying/cycling tour roughly following the route of Lewis & Clark along the Columbia, Missouri and Yellowstone rivers. They flew into various points along the route and then broke out the bikes to explore the area.

Easy Riders
Easy Riders

With so many of our visitors on long, high-miles-per-day tours it was refreshing when Valerie Wells, Sandy Fisher and Billie Kanter, all of Chico, California, walked in our front door in July of 1997. They had chosen Missoula as the start and finish point of a casual week long loop that took them to Rock Creek, Philipsburg, Georgetown Lake, Anaconda, the Big Hole Battlefield, Gibbons Pass and Sula.

Handlebar Poetry
Handlebar Poetry

Philosophy student Bradley Parsons likes to read. At least he did when he dropped into our office in 1997. He was riding from Jasper in Canada back to his home in Laguna Beach, California.

Good Medicine
Good Medicine

1995 was the year for Peter Underwood and Mary Jarosz’s big honeymoon ride. The two Wisconsin pharmacists began their ride in Yorktown, Virginia, the eastern trailhead of the Trans-America Trail. When they hit the west coast they rode south to Los Angeles then east to Las Vegas where the tour ended after a total of 7,116 miles.

Diversity, Unity
Diversity, Unity

This is our 1995 TransAm Expedition group. It was a diverse group, all strangers when they met in Yorktown, Virginia to begin their three-month tour. They were from the Netherlands, Japan, Germany, California, Virginia, Texas, Georgia, and Florida. There was an engineer, a postmaster, a nurse, a farmer, a management consultant, an administrator and a rider enjoying retirement. They ranged in age from 27 to 66.

Howe It's Done
Howe It's Done

Gordon Howe was a seasoned bicycle tourist when he came our way in the summer of 1995 on his Bob Jackson. He worked as a post-production editor at BBC Television, his employer for the previous 16 years. In 1990, he had ridden from New York City to Oregon by way of Los Angeles. In 1992, he rode from New York City to Montreal, Canada, He also toured extensively around the United Kingdom (his home), France, the Netherlands and Belgium. In 1995, he was riding from Calgary, Canada, to Denver, Colorado.

Taking A Header
Taking A Header

We don’t know a great deal about Brent Curtis beyond the basics. He dropped in on us in 1994. He was from California. He was riding a west to east TransAm with five companions. He was 25 years old. He worked in the computer technical support field.

17 Years Awheel
17 Years Awheel

Julian Uribe was deep into a round-the-world tour when he showed up at our office in September of 1993. He set out from his home in England and had ridden through Central Europe, Scandinavia, Russia, Turkey and North Africa. (In 1989 he had ridden from England to India, so this was his second big tour).

Family Support
Family Support

When John Goar was 16 he saw an ad for Bikecentennial ‘76. He wanted to sign up but just couldn’t get the money together to pull it off. In 1993, 17 years later, he decided it was time to tackle the TransAm Trail.